Happy Balloon

A local pediatrician’s office wanted to outfit their waiting room with an easy-to-pick-up game that would keep the kids entertained while waiting for their appointment. Aside from a request for it to be hot air balloon themed, I was given creative leeway to come up with whatever I wanted. Enter Happy Balloon. Originally named “Flappy

Interactive Visual Experience (IVE) Exhibit

IVE is the union of a Processing sketch with several “sensor boxes” controlled by an Arduino microcontroller.
As users interact with the buttons and ultrasonic sensors mounted to these boxes, the display of the Processing sketch projected on a wall changes. Users can interact with what type of objects are drawn on the screen, where the objects are located, object colors, object velocities, and more. The point of this installation is to encourage cooperation between users in creating a dynamic piece of art.

Jet Fighter Flight Simulator

This exhibit was another contract through the Explorium of Lexington. The Explorium had acquired an out-of-date trainer cockpit in which museum patrons could sit and marvel at the number of controls available to pilots, and use their imagination to take to the skies. They approached us (myself and Enomalies (Bill Gregory)) with a request to liven up the simulator with lights, a joystick and sound effects. We did them one better. We installed a gaming joystick in the cockpit and developed two games to engage the users in the wonders of flight. Check out the video below to view the flight simulator in action:

Whack-A-Snack

Developed and released in September of 2008, Whack-A-Snack is a children’s museum exhibit installed at the Explorium of Lexington in Lexington, KY. The Explorium approached us asking for an interactive exhibit that got kids moving and thinking about smart eating choices. Developed in partnership with Enomalies (Bill Gregory), Whack-A-Snack has been a tremendous hit with museum patrons.

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PHP + STL Files

Illustrates a bounding box of a pyramidA while back, I had the need to interpret an STL file (stereolithography), which is the general filetype of choice when dealing with rapid prototyping / 3D printing. My side business at the time had released a free 3D model viewer for the iPad, and we wanted to give estimates on prototyping costs whenever someone uploaded one of their own models. I couldn’t find any reasonable STL parsers that would work server-side, so I decided to make my own. The process of doing that, and the resulting files, are described below.